Ford’s F-150 Lightning Pro Just Got More Expensive

Shocking News: Ford Has Just Made Another Significant Increase to the Price of the Lowest-Priced F-150 Lightning Pro!

While it lasted, it was almost too fantastic of an experience. The original basic price that was assigned to the 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning Pro was eye-popping for its size, or lack thereof: Here was an all-electric full-size pickup truck that was advertised at only a little bit more than $41,000 (!).

To help keep that price so low, Ford employed a significant number of carryover parts from the standard, gas-fed F-150. In addition, Ford charged significantly more for larger batteries and better trim levels, guaranteeing that the more expensive versions boosted its bottom line.

Now, it would appear that the entry-level F-150 Lightning Pro ride as a noteworthy deal has come to an end. This comes as a result of Ford’s decision to raise the price of its least priced F-150 Lightning Pro model once again, which followed a price rise that took place in August.

Ford's F-150 Lightning Pro Just Got More Expensive
Ford’s F-150 Lightning Pro Just Got More Expensive

Only the Pro is affected by the new pricing, which raises the price of the truck from its initial, astonishing price of merely $41,769, which was later increased to $48,769, to $53,769. The Pro is the only model affected by the new pricing. Doing the arithmetic for you, that is a $12,000 increase over the price of the original Pro, and a $5,000 increase over the modified price published in August; in addition, it does not include the Mobile Power Cord, which costs $500, as an option if you choose to purchase it.

Even while Ford’s online build-your-own configurator seems to automatically include the Power Cord, it is not technically necessary to have one because any AC EV charger with a J1772 connector will work with the Lighting Pro to charge it on AC power. Lightning XLTs will continue to cost $61,269 for the regular range model and $82,769 for the extended range model. Lariats will cost between $76,269 and $87,769, depending on the size of the battery, while the Platinum model’s price for the extended range will stop your heart at $98,669.

Because of Ford’s recent pricing changes, the Pro is no longer considered a jaw-dropping value and has instead entered the realm of “lower-priced” products. Consider the Rivian R1T, which was the only other electric truck on the market at the time the Lightning was introduced and had a starting price of $68,575 for a dual-motor model at the time of the F-150 Lightning Pro launch. It was about $30,000 more expensive than the Ford that was now in second place.

Both the Chevrolet Silverado EV and the Tesla Cybertruck have not yet been released to the public for purchase. Even so, the Silverado WT is the only truck that promises to match the Lightning Pro’s pricing. Chevy claims that the entry-level Silverado EV will start at just $41,595, which is $74 less than what Ford was asking for the vehicle in the beginning. If the current pricing of the Silverado EV WT is maintained, it will have a price advantage of $12,174 over the F-150 Lightning Pro when it goes on sale the following year.

Why was there a rise in the price? In an interview with Automotive News, the Blue Oval cited problems with the supply chain in addition to “increasing material costs” (subscription required). Ford reached out to Ford for some additional information, and they provided us with the following statement in response: “Ford is adjusting the MSRP on the 2023 F-150 Lightning Pro due to ongoing supply chain constraints, rising material costs, and other market factors.”

We will continue to monitor pricing across the model year. Current retail order holders who are currently awaiting delivery are unaffected by this adjustment. Current commercial and government customers who have scheduled orders are also unaffected by this adjustment.”

Ford's F-150 Lightning Pro Just Got More Expensive
Ford’s F-150 Lightning Pro Just Got More Expensive

If you placed an order for an F-150 Lighting Pro prior to the time that this price increase went into effect, then the good news is that your order will be delivered at the price that was in force when you placed the order. We can’t speak to any dealership shenanigans that might inflate said price at the point of sale, but if you happen to encounter egregious markups, we recommend reaching out to Ford’s corporate offices; the automobile manufacturer is eager to tamp down on such “market adjustments.” When could the supply situation improve?

We questioned Ford if some of the material prices and difficulties are pushing them to speed up that timetable because the company is considering employing lithium iron phosphate (LFP or LiFePo4) batteries for the Lightning and the Mach-E at some point in the future. These batteries use lithium iron phosphate. In answer to that question, Ford did not provide us with any further information or clarification.

Where does this leave the F-150 Lightning Pro that’s meant for beginners? To be fair, Ford isn’t the only company changing its pricing strategy. Rivian has just discontinued its least expensive R1T Explore model, leaving only the R1T Adventure trim, which has a base price of $74,075. As a result, the F-150 Lighting Pro is still significantly more affordable, with a price tag of only $53,769. The GMC Hummer EV is the only other electric pickup truck now available, and even the base model of that vehicle costs $32,876 more than the Hummer EV2 does ($86,645 for the Hummer EV2).

However, the fact that the price of the Ford may not have changed significantly in comparison to those of other vehicles does not mean that we are not at least a little bit upset that the Lightning is now five figures more expensive than it was earlier this year. Although we are aware that there are competitive pressures at play, it appears like Ford is quickly losing the goodwill that it first gained from offering a low price for the Pro.

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