The European Union has decided not to roll the dice on internal combustion engines and will maintain this ban until 2035.

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No Dice for ICE: European Union Upholds 2035 Internal Combustion Engine Ban

The European Union has decided not to roll the dice on internal combustion engines and will maintain this ban until 2035.

We questioned out loud what this would mean for the manufacturers operating in the North American market in light of the fact that the European Union (EU) has decided to uphold its prohibition on the sale of new vehicles powered by internal combustion engines (ICE) by the year 2035. Would this make it necessary for the European manufacturers of new ICEs to be subject to a ban in the United States, Mexico, and Canada? We posed this question to the leading European manufacturers, wanting to know what they think it signifies and how it would affect their products in North America moving forward.

The European Union has decided not to roll the dice on internal combustion engines and will maintain this ban until 2035.
The European Union has decided not to roll the dice on internal combustion engines and will maintain this ban until 2035.

https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2022/6/8/eu-lawmakers-back-ban-on-new-fossil-fuel-cars-from-2035

Even if a number of states in the United States will begin enforcing a prohibition on the sale of new ICE products between the years 2030 and 2040, the law does not yet apply nationally. (It is important to keep in mind that executive orders are not laws; yet, national agencies are required to regard them as such until either the Supreme Court or a new president instructs them otherwise.) Usually.) If I’m being really honest, a complete ban on the sale of gasoline or diesel in the United States is unlikely to take place for decades, if it ever does so at all. The lobbying efforts of the oil companies have deep roots in the country. In the meanwhile, the European Union (EU) and its 27 member nations have come to the conclusion that, by the year 2035, a prohibition will be imposed on the sale of any new ICE, and that this restriction will, indeed, apply to the sale of.

internal combustion engines
internal combustion engines

new hybrid vehicles according to France 24. In the EU, the ownership of private vehicles is responsible for 12 percent of the region’s total carbon dioxide emissions, while the transportation sector as a whole is responsible for 25 percent. Let’s have a look at what this implies for European manufacturers that sell their products in this country now that the enforcement measures have been put into place:

To begin, there is no need to be concerned about a “proxy ban” or any other consequence analogous to it being a spillover effect from the judgment made by the EU. When one considers the leading European automakers who sell their wares in this region of the world, one finds that the majority of them already have plans in place to phase out the use of internal combustion engines (ICE) cars in their American lineups by that time, and in some cases, even sooner. The Volkswagen Group, which consists of VW, Audi, and Porsche in addition to its namesake brand, is the most prominent example. In instance, Audi plans to end sales of internal combustion engine (ICE) automobiles in the United States by roughly the year 2030 at the latest. Volkswagen, on the other hand, manufactures approximately 90 percent of the cars it sells in North America here in our region. These vehicles include the all-electric ID4 SUV. Because of this, the decision made by the EU would not have an effect on the market in the United States even if Volkswagen did not intend to make the transition to EVs in this country. Despite this, Volkswagen has plans to reduce the manufacture of internal combustion engines (ICE) through the years 2033 to 2035, and the year 2026 is when Volkswagen aims to debut its last new combustion engine.

The response from BMW is similar to what we received from VW, with the standard disclaimer that the firm does not speculate on future products, regardless of whether or not the 2035 ICE ban is implemented. Regardless, BMW also has facilities producing automobiles domestically here in North America with plants in Spartansburg, South Carolina (X-Series SUVs), as well as San Louis Potosi, Mexico. Both of these facilities are located in Mexico (2 Series, 3 Series, and upcoming M2). In addition to these, BMW operates 29 additional factories in 13 countries, giving it a great deal of flexibility to respond to changes in the market. BMW has ambitions to become an all-electric company worldwide by the year 2030 and to have at least 12 fully electric vehicles on sale worldwide by the year 2023. These vehicles will cover around 90 percent of BMW’s normal market groups. This indicates that, much like Volkswagen, BMW intended to transition to an all-electric vehicle before the 2035 EU ICE ban would ever become an issue for worldwide manufacturing and sales in the United States. The same can be said of Mercedes-Benz, which not only assembles a great number of vehicles in this country, but has also been planning for quite some time to launch a shadow electric portfolio under the “EQ” moniker.

See also: https://quickautobrain.com/1282-2/

Before the EU ultimately made it legal on their home soil, European manufacturers had already started making preparations for a future in which electric vehicles will replace all other types of vehicles. Europe and its manufacturers of transportation systems are about to enter the final decade and a half of their production of new internal combustion engine (ICE) cars, including hybrids. Even while the elimination of internal combustion engines (ICE) in Europe in 2035 would not have a direct impact on the market in the United States, the choice to switch to electric vehicles (EVs) even in North America was already being considered by automakers from Europe. Putting aside the possibility of an electric vehicle (EV) requirement in the United States, manufacturers in the United States are thinking along similar lines as their counterparts in Europe, and many of them intend on transitioning to all-electric vehicles around the same time. Their promises aren’t unbreakable, but that’s realistic; if customer choices restrict the availability of electric vehicles in our market, whether it’s because we don’t have a ban on internal combustion engines or for another reason, those automakers won’t be completely taken off guard.

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